Tuesday

Join an MS study from the comfort of home. Receive $50 for your time.

Are you interested in helping advance research for MS but don’t know where to start? You’re not alone. Taking part in a research study for MS can seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be.


A new at-home study called EMPOWER (Evaluating Multiple Sclerosis Patients ShOWing A GEnomic Signature of Therapy Response) is seeking volunteers with MS nationwide to better understand how MS affects the body. The goal of the study is to develop a blood test to help monitor disease activity and treatment response for people diagnosed with MS. The study is being conducted by DxTerity, a genomics company developing tests to better manage autoimmune diseases.

If you’re 18 years of age or older and have been diagnosed with MS (any type), you qualify.


Why Should I Take Part?
EMPOWER is an at-home study that can be completed in your free time. All you need to do is sign up online and a study kit will be mailed to your home.



What’s Next?
Follow the instructions in the fingerstick blood collection kit to collect a few drops of your blood (much like at-home glucose monitoring). Mail your sample to the research lab using the prepaid envelope.

When you’re done, log in to the secure study portal and complete a short survey online. You will be compensated $50 for your complete study participation, which you can keep or tell DxTerity donate to an MS charity of your choice. That’s it!

Ready to make a difference in MS research? I know I am. Click here to get started.



Thursday

Massage Benefits MS

Many folks have asked about the benefits of massage for folks with MS.
Bottom line, I prefer spending my money and health on massage than on many of the Western "medicines" created for MS. Which don't seem to be true medicine. They are drugs that cover up the symptoms. So how do we reduce the symptoms and treat MS proactively?



Massage!
Among other ways to live healthy including nutrition, exercise, and spiritual well being, massage is a great physical way to remove toxins from our bodies. Whatever caused our MS or whatever exacerbates it, the one thing we can do is keep our body as clean as possible.
Now this is not always easy. Trust me! Coffee, tobacco, alcohol, artificial sweeteners, fake foods, artificial or fake anything can send MS into a tizzy.
The goal always is to reduce these toxins and increase MS beneficial foods, such as cooling mung beans and detoxing apples.
One thing we can do to remove toxins is to have a massage. And what a treat it is!
Massage seems to help in several areas:
  • Spasticity
  • Pain
  • Fatigue
  • Poor circulation
  • Mental wellness...ahhhh....
The National MS Society has good information about massage and bodywork therapies click here. Here is the NMSS summary of how massage effects (or not) the course of MS.

"Massage and the underlying disease of MS

While massage can be helpful in relieving stress and inducing relaxation, it has no effect on the course of MS. A 1998 study investigated the effect of massage in people with MS on:
  • relief of anxiety and depression
  • improvement in mood, self-esteem and body image
  • increased ambulation and improved physical and social functioning.
The study used self-reports by the participants and found that, at the end of a five-week period, physical and social activity had improved in the people receiving massage. Those in the massage group also reported a decrease in depression. There was, however, no improvement in grip strength and only marginal improvement in ambulation."
So, keep up the massage and add some strength training or yoga to keep those muscles strong!
Lance Armstrong's LIVESTRONG.com talks about the benefits of massage on pain in MS sufferers. By reducing pain, massage can help folks become more mobile. Less pain = more movement. Folks withnMS don't want to be in bed. Sometimes we don't have much choice.Massage & Bodyworks Magazine has done their research with regards to MS and massage presenting us with one of the most comprehensive yet simple to digest articles summarizing MS, the disease, along with the benefits of massage. Click here for more. "For the MS patient, a well-being approach for addressing body, mind, and spirit is essential to combating the effects of the disease. Helpful self-care can include a daily routine of tai chi or yoga, meditation, and attention to diet." They get it. They get the disease and seem to understand what we need to feel better. Many therapists, especially in the Northwest where prevalence is higher, jphave numerous MS clients. Crowell is one of them:"With her extensive MS experience, Crowell says she has learned the importance of balance between releasing spasticity and maintaining enough tone for the client to function. "If you relax someone with MS too much, they can’t walk when they get off the table. They use the spasticity to keep them erect." By implementing a reflex response technique, she reduces spasms without decreasing tone. The client is better able to maintain standing balance, and for those who are not ambulatory, core stability is increased so they can sit better. "One of the things people tend to lose is control. You are working with refining the amount of contraction they use with a given movement." Wow! This is some great stuff. A must read for all with multiple sclerosis. Click here for full articleHere is a summary of MS symptoms. All can be helped with the right massage! The American Academy of Neurology talks about the most common massage techniques used for reducing pain in MS patients:Craniosacral massage: Light pressure is applied to the head, neck, and spine to ease tension and compression. This type of massage is not appropriate for people with conditions that could be affected by intracranial pressure changes, such as acute aneurysm, cerebral hemorrhage, or hydrocephaly.Lymphatic massage: Light, rhythmic strokes are used to improve the flow of lymph (a colorless fluid that helps fight infection and disease) and get rid of waste throughout the body. Lymphatic massage is often used to reduce post-surgical swelling and to help heal sports-related injuries.Myofascial release: Pressure and body positioning are used to loosen and stretch the muscles, fascia (connective tissue), and related structures. Both physical therapists and massage therapists who are appropriately trained use this technique.Reflexology: Specialized thumb and finger techniques are applied to reflex points in the hands and/or feet.Shiatsu: Gentle finger and hand pressure are applied to specific points on the body to relieve pain.Swedish massage: A variety of strokes and light-pressure techniques are used to enhance blood flow, remove waste products from tissues, stretch ligaments and tendons, and ease physical and emotional tension.Trigger point massage: Pressure is applied to trigger points (tender areas where the muscles have been damaged or where tension accumulates) to alleviate muscle spasms and pain.One of my favorites? Lymphatic massage...you can feel the toxins being squeegeed out of you! But I love them all. In fact, I'm off to get one now! What's your experience? Pro massage or toss it?

Friday

NEW Radio Show - Girl with MS launches weekly radio show!

Join me every Sunday, 5:30PST / 8:30ESt on MS and ME radio, part of the MS Global Support Network.  




Archived radio shows found by clicking here.


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